OH DID I SAY LANGUAGE? YES, I did! Well.... you see, actually all "languages" are "dialects" of other languages, which are also dialects of other languages, and so on... Because languages are affected by each other, all languages have borrowed words from other languages. BUT, choosing to refer to a language as an independent language or a dialect (to relate it to another language), all depends on your very own influences, rather those be religious, political, etc...

There are many dialects from Arabic in the region: Egyptian, Moroccan, Tunisian, Levantine, Gulf, etc, and they all share common words that have their roots in Standard Arabic. But let's not ignore many facts: there are many other words that are uncommon among the "dialects", and there are dialects which are very different from each other. And bearing in mind that a language is not only made of "words", then there will be found many "grammatical", phonetic, word-order differences, etc, among those dialects/languages.

Now, let's compare this to another group of languages: Germanic Languages.

German and Dutch are both "Germanic languages", they have their common roots in the ancient "Germanic" language. It is a known situation where one German and one Dutch would speak each in his own language making up an easily-understandable dialog between them. German and Dutch are VERY similar: similar words, similar word orders, similar grammar, but yet they are two independent languages. Using the "dialect" concept, those languages should be called "the German dialect of Germanic," and "the Dutch dialect of Germanic," respectively.

Also, when you think of a language that bears the name of a country as the language solely spoken by the dwellers of that specific country, then this makes a lot of sense calling Egyptian, the language of Egyptians, the "Egyptian" language; the language of Egypt; the Egyptian "speak", etc...

Maltese is a language with many Arabic-root words, and many other Italian-root words, which makes Maltese sound like a mix of Arabic and Italian. And because Malta lacks the religious and political influences available in the Middle East, it has recognized its language as a separate independent language, because it's the language of Malta. Not an Arabic dialect, and not an Italian dialect.